24 Ducks in Georgia

24 Ducks in Georgia

Ducks in Georgia offer a captivating sight for bird enthusiasts and nature lovers alike. This southern state boasts a diverse range of duck species, creating a haven for these aquatic birds.

From the stunning Wood Duck with its vibrant plumage to the graceful Hooded Merganser, Georgia’s wetlands, and lakes are home to a rich tapestry of avian life. This article explores the fascinating world of ducks in Georgia, shedding light on their habits, habitats, and the importance of conserving these captivating creatures.

1. Mallard

  • Scientific name: Anas platyrhynchos
  • Life span: 5-10 years
  • Size: 50-65 cm (20-26 in)
  • Weight: 700-1600 g (1.5-3.5 lb)
  • Wingspan: 81-98 cm (32-39 in)
  • Status: Least Concern
  • Sate status: Breeding and common

The Mallard, a versatile and striking duck species, is renowned for its widespread distribution across various continents. With its vibrant green head, yellow bill, and intricate feather patterns, the Mallard adds a touch of brilliance to diverse habitats.

Interestingly, Mallards are known for their adaptability and have successfully colonized numerous parts of the world, making them one of the most widely distributed duck species globally.

Close-up photo of a Mallard

Mallards often build nests on the ground near water, concealed in vegetation or brush.

Mallards are omnivorous, feeding on a variety of plant matter, seeds, insects, and small aquatic organisms.

Mallards are widespread and not currently of conservation concern. Efforts focus on habitat conservation and protecting nesting areas.

2. Northern Pintail

  • Scientific name: Anas acuta
  • Life span: 10-15 years
  • Size: 56-66 cm (22-26 in)
  • Weight: 450-1150 g (1-2.5 lb
  • Wingspan: 80-95 cm (31-38 in)
  • Status: Least Concern
  • State status: Migratory and uncommon

The Northern Pintail, an elegant and distinctive duck species, graces diverse habitats across the Northern Hemisphere. With its long, slender neck and pointed tail feathers, the Pintail stands out among its avian counterparts. Known for their remarkable aerial acrobatics during courtship displays, these agile ducks can perform mesmerizing synchronized flights.

A pair of Northern Pintails swimming in a body of water

Northern Pintails construct nests on the ground in grassy areas near wetlands or water bodies. They primarily feed on plant matter, seeds, and small invertebrates obtained by dabbling or grazing.

Northern Pintails are considered a species of least concern. Conservation efforts aim to preserve wetland habitats critical for nesting and migration.

3. Northern Shoveler

  • Scientific name: Spatula clypeata
  • Life span: 10-15 years          
  • Size: 43-53 cm (17-21 in)
  • Weight: 400-1100 g (0.88-2.4 lb)
  • Wingspan: 74-86 cm (29-34 in)
  • Status: Least Concern
  • State status: Migratory and uncommon

The Northern Shoveler, known for its unique spatula-shaped bill, is found across North America, Europe, and Asia. These ducks boast vibrant plumage and are skilled filter-feeders, scooping up food from the water’s surface. Fun fact: Their bills have specialized structures that allow them to strain small invertebrates and plant matter efficiently.

A Northern Shoveler looking for food in the evening

Northern Shovelers build nests on the ground in grassy or marshy areas near water. They are filter-feeders, using their unique shovel-like bills to strain out small invertebrates, seeds, and vegetation.

Northern Shovelers are generally stable. Conservation efforts focus on preserving wetlands and providing suitable nesting habitat.

4. Lesser Scaup

  • Scientific name: Aythya affinis
  • Life span: 12-15 years
  • Size: 38-48 cm (15-19 in)
  • Weight: 400-1000 g (0.88-2.2 lb)
  • Wingspan: 64-74 cm (25-29 in)
  • Status: Least Concern
  • State status: Migratory and uncommon

Lesser Scaups are medium-sized diving ducks that can be found in North America and Eurasia. Males sport striking black and white plumage with yellow eyes, while females exhibit mottled brown patterns. Fun fact: Lesser Scaups are exceptional divers, capable of reaching depths of up to 20 meters (66 feet) in search of aquatic invertebrates.

A flock of Lesser Scaups in flight

Lesser Scaups typically construct nests in emergent vegetation near water bodies.

They primarily feed on small aquatic invertebrates, seeds, and plant matter obtained by diving.

Lesser Scaups face population declines and are a conservation concern. Conservation efforts aim to address habitat loss, pollution, and other threats.

5. American Wigeon

  • Scientific name: Mareca americana
  • Life span: 12-15 years
  • Size: 42-59 cm (17-23 in)
  • Weight: 600-1200 g (1.3-2.6 lb)
  • Wingspan: 76-91 cm (30-36 in)
  • Status: Least Concern
  • State status: Migratory and uncommon

American Wigeons are migratory dabbling ducks that breed in North America and winter in parts of Central and South America. These ducks have a beautiful mix of chestnut, gray, and white feathers, with males showcasing a striking green eyepatch. Fun fact: American Wigeons are often referred to as “baldpates” due to their light-colored foreheads.

Close-up of a swimming American Wigeon

American Wigeons often build nests on the ground near water, concealed in vegetation or grasses.

They are dabbling ducks that feed on a variety of plant matter, seeds, and invertebrates.

American Wigeons are not of immediate conservation concern. Conservation efforts focus on protecting their wetland habitats.

6. Wood Duck

  • Scientific name: Aix sponsa
  • Life span: 5-10 years
  • Size: 48-54 cm (19-21 in)
  • Weight: 454-862 g (1-1.9 lb)
  • Wingspan: 66-73 cm (26-29 in)
  • Status: Least Concern
  • State status: Breeding and common

Wood Ducks are stunningly colourful ducks native to North America. Males are adorned with iridescent green, purple, and white plumage, while females exhibit more subtle shades of brown and gray. Fun fact: Wood Ducks are the only North American duck species that regularly produce two broods in a single nesting season, maximizing their reproductive success.

Wood duck standing near a body of water

Wood Ducks nest in tree cavities or nest boxes, often near water bodies or wetlands.

They are omnivorous, consuming seeds, fruits, acorns, insects, and aquatic invertebrates.

Wood Ducks have made a successful recovery due to conservation efforts, including habitat restoration and nest box programs.

7. Blue-winged Teal

  • Scientific name: Spatula discors
  • Life span: 5-10 years
  • Size: 40-47 cm (16-19 in)
  • Weight: 280-420 g (9.9-14.8 oz)
  • Wingspan: 58-63 cm (23-25 in)
  • Status: Least Concern
  • State status: Migratory and uncommon

Blue-winged Teals are small dabbling ducks found in North and South America. Males feature a distinct blue patch on their wings, a chestnut-coloured head, and a speckled body. Females are mottled brown with a pale eye ring. Fun fact: Blue-winged Teals are exceptional long-distance migrants, traveling thousands of kilometers during their annual migration.

A male Blue Winged Teal

Blue-winged Teals often nest in dense vegetation near water sources, creating nests on the ground.

They feed primarily on seeds and aquatic invertebrates, obtained by dabbling or grazing.

Blue-winged Teals are generally abundant, and conservation efforts focus on wetland preservation and maintaining suitable nesting habitats.

8. Gadwall

  • Scientific name: Mareca strepera
  • Life span: 5-10 years
  • Size: 46-56 cm (18-22 in)
  • Weight: 800-1,350 g (1.8-3 lb)
  • Wingspan: 81-95 cm (32-37 in)
  • Status: Least Concern
  • State status: Migratory and uncommon

Gadwalls are widespread ducks found across Europe, Asia, and North America. These medium-sized dabbling ducks exhibit a mottled gray-brown plumage, with males boasting a distinctive black rear and white speculum. Fun fact: Gadwalls are known for their quiet and subtle courtship displays compared to other duck species.

A male Gadwall in flight

Gadwalls build ground nests near water bodies, utilizing vegetation for concealment. They often nest in dense grasses or under shrubs.

Gadwalls are dabbling ducks with a varied diet. They feed on seeds, aquatic plants, insects, and small invertebrates.

Gadwalls have stable populations and are not currently of conservation concern. Conservation efforts focus on wetland preservation, habitat management, and protecting nesting areas.

9. Green-winged Teal

  • Scientific name: Anas crecca
  • Life span: 5-10 years
  • Size: 33-38 cm (13-15 in)
  • Weight: 150-400 g (5.3-14.1 oz)
  • Wingspan: 53-59 cm (21-23 in)
  • Status: Least Concern
  • State status: Migratory and uncommon

Green-winged Teals are small dabbling ducks found throughout North and South America. Males display a stunning combination of brown, green, and chestnut plumage, while females showcase mottled brown patterns. Fun fact: Despite their small size, Green-winged Teals are swift flyers and can reach impressive speeds during migration.

A swimming Green-winged Teal

Green-winged Teals nest on the ground in grassy areas near wetlands, utilizing vegetation for cover. They prefer nesting sites near water bodies.

Green-winged Teals are dabbling ducks that primarily feed on seeds, aquatic plants, and invertebrates.

Green-winged Teals are abundant and not considered endangered. Conservation efforts focus on preserving wetland habitats and protecting nesting areas.

10. American Black Duck

  • Scientific name: Anas rubripes
  • Life span: 5-10 years
  • Size: 54-63 cm (21-25 in)
  • Weight: 727-1,380 g (1.6-3 lb)
  • Wingspan: 91-102 cm (36-40 in)
  • Status: Least Concern
  • State status: Migratory and uncommon

American Black Ducks inhabit wetlands across eastern North America. With their dark brown plumage, pale face, and yellowish bill, they are easily distinguished. Fun fact: American Black Ducks are known for their tendency to hybridize with other duck species, making them a subject of interest for hybridization studies.

A swimming American Black Duck

American Black Ducks build ground nests in vegetated areas near water bodies, concealed from predators. They prefer nesting sites in marshes or wetlands.

American Black Ducks are dabbling ducks with a diverse diet. They feed on plant matter, seeds, insects, mollusks, and crustaceans.

American Black Ducks have faced population declines due to habitat loss and hybridization with Mallards. Conservation efforts include habitat protection, reducing hybridization, and maintaining genetic diversity.

11. Ring-necked Duck

  • Scientific name: Aythya collaris
  • Life span: 5-10 years
  • Size: 39-46 cm (15-18 in)
  • Weight: 680-1,360 g (1.5-3 lb)
  • Wingspan: 63-76 cm (25-30 in)
  • Status: Least Concern
  • State status: Migratory and uncommon

Ring-necked Ducks can be found in North America, Europe, and Asia. Males exhibit striking black plumage with a distinctive white ring around their bills, while females showcase a mottled brown pattern. Fun fact: Ring-necked Ducks are known for their impressive diving abilities, capable of staying submerged for up to a minute.

A female Ring-Necked Duck in flight

Ring-necked Ducks build nests in dense vegetation near wetlands or water bodies. They prefer nesting sites concealed in marshes or along the edges of lakes.

They are diving ducks that primarily feed on aquatic invertebrates, seeds, and plant matter obtained by diving.

Ring-necked Ducks have stable populations. Conservation efforts focus on maintaining healthy wetland ecosystems and providing suitable nesting structures.

12. Bufflehead

  • Scientific name: Bucephala albeola
  • Life span: 12-15 years
  • Size: 32-40 cm (13-16 in)
  • Weight: 270-550 g (9.5-19.4 oz)
  • Wingspan: 46-54 cm (18-21 in)
  • Status: Least Concern
  • State status: Migratory and uncommon

Buffleheads are small diving ducks found across North America. Males feature eye-catching black and white plumage with iridescent green and purple head feathers. Females exhibit a similar pattern but with a chestnut-coloured head. Fun fact: Buffleheads have incredibly fast wingbeats, reaching speeds of up to 400 beats per minute.

Close-up photo of a male Bufflehead

Buffleheads nest in tree cavities or nest boxes near water bodies, often in wooded areas. They prefer nesting sites close to water.

Buffleheads are diving ducks that feed primarily on aquatic invertebrates, small fish, and insect larvae.

This species has a stable population. Conservation efforts involve protecting nesting habitats, conserving suitable foraging areas, and maintaining nest boxes.

13. Ruddy Duck

  • Scientific name: Oxyura jamaicensis
  • Life span: 6-8 years
  • Size: 36-43 cm (14-17 in)
  • Weight: 430-790 g (0.95-1.74 lb)
  • Wingspan: 61-74 cm (24-29 in)
  • Status: Least Concern
  • State status: Migratory and uncommon

Ruddy Ducks inhabit wetlands in North and South America. Males display a vibrant chestnut body, blue bill, and a white cheek patch. Females have a more subtle brown plumage with a dark crown. Fun fact: Ruddy Ducks are known for their distinctive courtship display called “bubble display” where males blow bubbles through their bills to impress females.

A pair of Ruddy Ducks

Ruddy Ducks build nests in emergent vegetation near water bodies, utilizing plant cover for concealment. They prefer nesting sites in marshes or wetlands.

Ruddy Ducks are diving ducks with a diet consisting of aquatic invertebrates, seeds, and plant matter obtained by diving.

Ruddy Ducks have stable populations. Conservation efforts focus on maintaining wetland habitats, ensuring water quality, and protecting breeding sites.

14. Redhead

  • Scientific name: Aythya americana
  • Life span: 10-15 years
  • Size: 42-49 cm (17-19 in)
  • Weight: 850-1,600 g (1.9-3.5 lb)
  • Wingspan: 76-84 cm (30-33 in)
  • Status: Least Concern
  • State status: Migratory and uncommon

Redheads are diving ducks native to North America. Males flaunt vibrant red heads, black chests, and gray bodies, while females exhibit mottled brown plumage. Fun fact: Redheads are known for their synchronized courtship displays, where males form large groups and simultaneously display their colourful plumage.

Close-up photo of a Redhead

Redheads construct nests on the ground in grassy or marshy areas near water, concealed from predators. They prefer nesting sites close to water bodies.

Redheads are diving ducks with a diet consisting of aquatic plants, seeds, and invertebrates obtained by diving.

Redheads have stable populations. Conservation efforts involve wetland conservation, protection of nesting areas, and management of hunting regulations.

15. Mottled Duck

  • Scientific name: Anas fulvigula
  • Life span: 5-10 years
  • Size: 48-56 cm (19-22 in)
  • Weight: 600-1,070 g (1.3-2.4 lb)
  • Wingspan: 91-102 cm (36-40 in)
  • Status: Least Concern
  • State status: Breeding and common

Mottled Ducks are resident dabbling ducks found along the Gulf Coast of the United States. They have a mottled brown body, a distinctive dark eye patch, and a yellow bill. Fun fact: Mottled Ducks are closely related to Mallards but have a more restricted range, making them a unique and localized species.

Two Mottled Ducks resting in the high vegetation

Mottled Ducks build ground nests in grassy or marshy areas near water bodies, seeking cover from surrounding vegetation. They prefer nesting sites within wetland habitats.

They too are dabbling ducks with a varied diet, feeding on plant matter, seeds, insects, and small invertebrates.

Mottled Ducks are localized and face threats from habitat loss. Conservation efforts focus on preserving wetlands, protecting nesting areas, and managing hunting regulations.

16. Canvasback

  • Scientific name: Aythya valisineria
  • Life span: 10-15 years
  • Size: 48-56 cm (19-22 in)
  • Weight: 1,270-1,800 g (2.8-4 lb)
  • Wingspan: 84-89 cm (33-35 in)
  • Status: Vulnerable
  • State status: Migratory and uncommon

Canvasbacks are diving ducks that breed in North America and winter in parts of the United States and Mexico. Males exhibit a striking reddish-brown head, black chest, and white body, while females have a mottled brown appearance.

Fun fact: Canvasbacks are known for their exceptional diving abilities, capable of diving up to depths of 6 meters (20 feet) in search of food.

Close-up photo of a male Canvasback

Canvasbacks build nests in dense vegetation near water bodies, often concealed among cattails or reeds. They prefer nesting sites within marshes or wetlands.

They are diving ducks that primarily feed on aquatic plants, seeds, and invertebrates obtained by diving.

Canvasbacks have shown population declines due to habitat loss and water quality issues. Conservation efforts include wetland restoration, habitat protection, and promoting sustainable hunting practices.

17. Greater Scaup

  • Scientific name: Aythya marila
  • Life span: 10-20 years
  • Size: 41-51 cm (16-20 in)
  • Weight: 900-1,600 g (2-3.5 lb)
  • Wingspan: 81-87 cm (32-34 in)
  • Status: Least Concern
  • State status: Migratory and uncommon

Greater Scaups are diving ducks found across North America, Europe, and Asia. Males showcase black heads, white sides, and a pale blue bill, while females have a more subdued brown plumage. Fun fact: Greater Scaups are expert divers and can plunge as deep as 8 meters (26 feet) to forage for mollusks and crustaceans.

A resting Greater Scaup

Greater Scaups build nests in dense vegetation near water bodies, often concealed among reeds or grasses. They prefer nesting sites in marshes or along the edges of lakes.

Greater Scaups are diving ducks that feed on a variety of aquatic invertebrates, seeds, and plant matter obtained by diving.

They face threats from habitat degradation and pollution. Conservation efforts focus on preserving wetland ecosystems, protecting nesting areas, and monitoring population trends.

18. Hooded Merganser

  • Scientific name: Lophodytes cucullatus
  • Life span: 6-12 years
  • Size: 40-49 cm (16-19 in)
  • Weight: 400-700 g (0.88-1.54 lb)
  • Wingspan: 63-76 cm (25-30 in)
  • Status: Least Concern
  • State status: Breeding and common

Hooded Mergansers are small diving ducks native to North America. Males exhibit a striking black and white pattern with a large, fan-shaped crest on their head. Females have a cinnamon-brown crest and a mottled brown body. Fun fact: Hooded Mergansers have a unique courtship behavior where males expand and display their crests to attract females.

Two Hooded Merganser males

They nest in tree cavities or nest boxes near water bodies, often in wooded areas. They prefer nesting sites close to water.

Hooded Mergansers are diving ducks with a diet consisting of small fish, amphibians, crustaceans, and aquatic invertebrates.

Hooded Mergansers have stable populations. Conservation efforts involve protecting nesting habitats, conserving suitable foraging areas, and maintaining nest boxes.

19. Red-breasted Merganser

  • Scientific name: Mergus serrator
  • Life span: 9-14 years
  • Size: 54-62 cm (21-24 in)
  • Weight: 700-1,600 g (1.5-3.5 lb)
  • Wingspan: 66-81 cm (26-32 in)
  • Status: Least Concern
  • State status: Migratory and uncommon

Red-breasted Mergansers are diving ducks found in North America, Europe, and Asia. Males have a distinctive shaggy crest, reddish-brown neck, and gray body. Females have a more subdued brown appearance. Fun fact: Red-breasted Mergansers are excellent divers and can swim underwater with their wings while pursuing fish prey.

Extreme closeup of a Red-Breasted Merganser

Red-breasted Mergansers build nests in dense vegetation near water bodies, utilizing plant cover for concealment. They prefer nesting sites in coastal or freshwater areas.

They are diving ducks that feed primarily on fish, crustaceans, and aquatic invertebrates obtained by diving.

Red-breasted Mergansers have stable populations. Conservation efforts focus on maintaining healthy coastal and freshwater habitats, protecting nesting areas, and monitoring population trends.

20. Black Scoter

  • Scientific name: Melanitta americana
  • Life span: 10-15 years
  • Size: 43-54 cm (17-21 in)
  • Weight: 43-54 cm (17-21 in)
  • Wingspan: 79-91 cm (31-36 in)
  • Status: Least Concern
  • State status: Migratory and rare

Black Scoters are sea ducks that breed in northern North America and Eurasia. Males have all-black plumage with a bright yellow knob on their bill. Females are brown with paler cheeks. Fun fact: Black Scoters are known for their incredible long-distance migrations, with some individuals traveling over 3,000 miles during their annual journey.

A Black Scoter walking on wet soil

Black Scoters build nests in ground depressions lined with grass or vegetation near water bodies, often concealed among rocks or shrubs. They prefer nesting sites along coastal or nearshore areas.

They are diving ducks that primarily feed on mollusks, crustaceans, and aquatic invertebrates obtained by diving.

They have shown declines in some regions due to habitat degradation and pollution. Conservation efforts focus on protecting coastal habitats, reducing disturbances, and promoting sustainable fisheries practices.

21. Common Goldeneye

  • Scientific name: Bucephala clangula
  • Life span: 6-12 years
  • Size: 40-51 cm (16-20 in)
  • Weight: 800-1,550 g (1.8-3.4 lb)
  • Wingspan: 66-81 cm (26-32 in)
  • Status: Least Concern
  • State status: Migratory and uncommon

Common Goldeneyes are diving ducks that inhabit North America and parts of Europe and Asia. Males exhibit striking black and white plumage with a golden-yellow eye and a conspicuous white patch on their face. Fun fact: Common Goldeneyes have an incredible underwater vision, allowing them to spot prey even in murky waters.

A pair of Common Goldeneyes

Common Goldeneyes nest in tree cavities near water bodies, often in forests or wooded areas. They select nesting sites in close proximity to their preferred foraging areas.

Common Goldeneyes are diving ducks that primarily feed on aquatic invertebrates, fish, and small crustaceans obtained by diving.

The Common Goldeneyes have stable populations. Conservation efforts focus on preserving nesting habitats, conserving wetland ecosystems, and monitoring population trends.

22. White-winged Scoter

  • Scientific name: Melanitta fusca
  • Life span: 10-15 years
  • Size: 48-58 cm (19-23 in)
  • Weight: 900-2,800 g (2-6.2 lb)
  • Wingspan: 81-97 cm (32-38 in)
  • Status: Least Concern
  • State status: Migratory and uncommon

White-winged Scoters are sea ducks found in North America and Eurasia. Males display all-black plumage with distinctive white patches on their wings. Females have a dark brown appearance. Fun fact: White-winged Scoters are strong and fast flyers, capable of reaching speeds up to 80 km/h (50 mph) during migration.

Two male White-Winged Scoters in flight

White-winged Scoters build nests on the ground near water bodies, often concealed among vegetation or rocks. They prefer nesting sites in coastal or nearshore areas.

White-winged Scoters are diving ducks that primarily feed on mollusks, crustaceans, and aquatic invertebrates obtained by diving.

White-winged Scoters have shown declines in some regions due to habitat degradation and pollution. Conservation efforts focus on protecting coastal habitats, reducing disturbances, and promoting sustainable fisheries practices.

23. Surf Scoter

  • Scientific name: Melanitta perspicillata
  • Life span: 10-20 years
  • Size: 45-54 cm (18-21 in)
  • Weight: 710-1,980 g (1.6-4.4 lb)
  • Wingspan: 76-91 cm (30-36 in)
  • Status: Least Concern
  • State status: Migratory and rare

Surf Scoters are sea ducks native to North America. Males have a bold black body, white patches on the forehead and nape, and a bright orange bill. Females exhibit a more subdued brown plumage. Fun fact: Surf Scoters are known for their unique feeding behavior called “bobbing,” where they dive briefly and pop back up to the water’s surface.

A Surf Scoter flapping its wings in the water

Surf Scoters build nests on the ground near water bodies, often in coastal tundra or grassy areas. They prefer nesting sites close to their preferred foraging areas.

Surf Scoters are diving ducks that primarily feed on mollusks, crustaceans, and aquatic invertebrates obtained by diving.

They too have stable populations. Conservation efforts involve protecting coastal habitats, reducing disturbances, and monitoring population trends.

24. Long-tailed Duck

  • Scientific name: Clangula hyemalis
  • Life span: 6-12 years
  • Size: 43-58 cm (17-23 in)
  • Weight: 430-1,160 g (0.95-2.6 lb)
  • Wingspan: 61-84 cm (24-33 in)
  • Status: Least Concern
  • State status: Migratory and rare

Long-tailed Ducks breed in the Arctic regions of North America and Eurasia and winter along coastlines and large inland lakes. Males showcase a striking plumage with a long, elegant tail, white body, and gray head. Females have a more subdued brown appearance. Fun fact: Long-tailed Ducks have the ability to dive to incredible depths, reaching up to 60 meters (200 feet) underwater in search of prey.

A Long-Tailed Duck in flight

Long-tailed Ducks build nests on the ground in tundra or grassy areas near water bodies, concealed among vegetation or rocks. They prefer nesting sites in Arctic or subarctic regions.

They too are diving ducks with a diet consisting of small fish, crustaceans, mollusks, and aquatic invertebrates obtained by diving.

Long-tailed Ducks have stable populations. Conservation efforts focus on preserving Arctic and subarctic habitats, monitoring breeding success, and understanding the impacts of climate change on their populations.

Where to find Ducks in Georgia

Georgia offers excellent opportunities for birdwatchers to find a diverse range of duck species. To observe ducks in Georgia, head to wetland areas such as marshes, swamps, and reservoirs, which serve as prime habitats for these water-loving birds. The following are four notable areas to spot ducks:

  • Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge: This vast wetland provides a haven for various duck species, including Wood Ducks, Mallards, and Gadwalls. Explore the refuge’s water trails by kayak or take a guided boat tour for optimal viewing opportunities.
  • J. Strom Thurmond Lake: As one of the largest reservoirs in the southeastern United States, it attracts an array of duck species. Scan the lake’s shoreline and coves to spot ducks like Ring-necked Ducks, Canvasbacks, and Buffleheads.
  • Altamaha Wildlife Management Area: With its extensive wetlands and freshwater impoundments, this area offers ideal habitats for ducks. Look for species like Green-winged Teals, Hooded Mergansers, and American Wigeons.
  • Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge: Located on the Georgia coast, this refuge hosts a variety of ducks, including Northern Pintails, Redheads, and Ruddy Ducks. Explore the refuge’s trails and observation platforms for excellent birdwatching opportunities.

To observe ducks, bring binoculars or a spotting scope for better visibility. Patience is key, as ducks may be found at various distances on the water. Respect their habitats and maintain a safe distance to avoid disturbance.

Conclusion

Georgia’s diverse ecosystems provide a welcoming habitat for a variety of duck species. The state’s wetlands and lakes serve as crucial breeding grounds and stopover sites for these magnificent birds during migration.

By appreciating and preserving the natural habitats that support these ducks, we can ensure their continued presence and contribute to the preservation of Georgia’s rich avian biodiversity for future generations to enjoy.

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