Magenta Petrel2001

Magenta Petrel2001

Summary:

Worldwide Species Action Plans

Magenta Petrel action planThe Chatham Island taiko Pterodroma magentae is a petrel endemic to the Chatham Islands, with a population estimated to number less than 150 birds. Until 1999, only six burrows were known to have had taiko attempt to breed in them. A highly successful telemetry operation in 1999 may have added up to five breeding burrows to this total. The taiko is among New Zealand?s most endangered species, considered to be on the brink of extinction. The taiko was believed to be extinct for almost a century, until its rediscovery by David Crockett in 1978 (Crockett 1979, 1994a). Nearly ten years later, in 1987, the first taiko burrow was discovered near one of the tributaries of the Tuku-a-tamatea River, in southern Chatham Island. The Department of Conservation presently ranks taiko as Category A, the highest priority category for conservation management (Molloy & Davis 1994). Taiko are also ranked internationally as Critically Endangered by the IUCN Red List Categories (BirdLife 2000). This plan sets out the recovery programme for taiko over the next ten years (2001-2011). It is preceded by the first taiko recovery plan covering the period 1994 to 1998 (Grant 1994). Taiko conservation was also covered in the draft Chatham Island threatened species management strategy (Grant 1991).


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