Bolles Laurel Pigeon

Bolles Laurel Pigeon

Summary:

Profile Bolles Laurel Pigeon
[order] Columbiformes

[order] Columbiformes | [family] Columbidae | [latin] Columba bollii | [UK] Bolles Laurel Pigeon | [FR] Pigeon de Bolle | [DE] Kanarentaube | [ES] Paloma turque | [IT] Colomba di Bolle | [NL] Bolles Laurierduif

Bolles Laurierduif determination

No film available

Large, dark brown and grey pigeon. Mainly dark sepia-brown, redder on underparts. Pale grey tail with broad, whitish terminal band. Extensive green gloss to rear crown and hindneck becoming pink on upper mantle. Whitish bill and pale eye. Similar spp. Dark-tailed Laurel Pigeon C. bollii has pale grey subterminal band and blackish terminal band to tail. Dark tail base and rump and overall slate-grey colouration. Voice Crooning pu-pu-pooo.

Nesting occurs exclusively in trees within laurel forest. The height of the nest varies, the most frequently used tree species being Erica arborea, Laurus azorica, Myrica faya and Ilex canariensis. Nests appear well camouflaged by foliage possibly to protect them from aerial predators such as Sparrowhawk Accipiter nisus, Buzzard Buteo buteo or Raven Corvus corax. They can be re-used for successive clutches and successive years. The most common nest material is small branches of heath Erica arborea.

Columba bollii is endemic to Europe, where it has a very small range (
This species is found on Tenerife, La Palma, La Gomera and El Hierro. On Gran Canaria the remains of a pigeon that used to inhabit the island have been found. Its bones are similar to those of Laurel Pigeons, but it has not been possible to identify the species due to lack of comparative material.

The estimated minimum total population of Dark-tailed Laurel Pigeon is 1,150-1,300 individuals (Emmerson 1985) However, recent studies suggest that the population is about 1,700 individuals.

The diet is mainly made up of fruit the precise composition varying with the timing of fruiting of different tree species. Besides fruit, the birds feed on leaves, shoots, and leaf and flower buds, and they may, if the opportunity presents itself, supplement their diet with small invertebrates. Some cereals (wheat, rye) are also taken. Birds have been observed feeding both on the ground and in the trees.


Columba bollii has an estimated population of 2,200 individuals on the Canary Islands, Spain, where it inhabits closed-canopy laurel forest. Birds are found on Tenerife (at least 350-400 birds, particularly at Anaga and Los Silos), La Palma (250-300 in a restricted area of the north-west), La Gomera (over 1,000 in Garajonay National Park with some birds outside the park) and El Hierro (over 30). It may formerly have occurred on Gran Canaria, as bones similar to those of a laurel pigeon have been found and there is a possible sight record from the late 19th century. Historical declines resulted from intensive exploitation of laurel forests. The extent of forest loss has slowed, although fragmentation has continued as forests are exploited for poles and tool handles. Illegal hunting occurs at drinking sites. As it is a tree-nesting species, predation by rats is of less significance than for C. junoniae and is unlikely to cause significant declines1. Despite these threats the population seems to be stable, although this requires confirmation. A European action plan was published in 1996. [conservation status from birdlife.org]


Nesting occurs exclusively in trees within laurel forest. The height of the nest varies, the most frequently used tree species being Erica arborea, Laurus azorica, Myrica faya and Ilex canariensis. Nests appear well camouflaged by foliage possibly to protect them from aerial predators such as Sparrowhawk Accipiter nisus, Buzzard Buteo buteo or Raven Corvus corax. They can be re-used for successive clutches and successive years. The most common nest material is small branches of heath Erica arborea.

The breeding season extends from October to July although it is very possible that birds breed all year round. The long breeding season must be related to the continuous availability of fruit, the main food of this species.

The clutch is a single egg incubated for 18-19 days and the chicks spend 30-35 days in the nest.

Resident and endemic to the canary islands

Specification

  1. Measurements
  2. spanwidth min.: 65 cm
  3. spanwidth max.: 68 cm
  4. size min.: 37 cm
  5. size max.: 40 cm
  6. Breeding
  7. incubation min.: 18 days
  8. incubation max.: 19 days
  9. fledging min.: days
  10. fledging max.: days
  11. broods 2
  12. eggs min.: 1
  13. eggs max.: 1
  14. Conservation Status
  15. Bolles Laurierduif status Near Threatened
Join the discussion